Franklin &  Marshall College Library

ENG 105: AMERICAN DREAMS

RESARCH RESOURCES


GENERAL SOURCES

The Peoplepedia
Ref E 156 .K74 1996

American Decades
Ref E 169.12 .A419

American Chronicle
Ref E 169.1 .G664 1999

American Culture After World War II
Ref E 169.12 .A418 1994

Atlas of Contemporary America
Ref E 169.12 .D69 1994

Dictionary of American History
Ref E 174 .A43 1976

Encyclopedia of American History
Ref E 174.5 .E52 1996

A Nation of Peoples
Ref E 184 .A1 N2866 1999

Encyclopedia of the U.S. in the 20th Century
Ref E 740.7 .E53

Encyclopedia of American Social History
Ref HN 57 .E58 1993

Encyclopedia of Social Issues
Ref HN 57 .E59 1997




TOPICAL SOURCES

Congressional Quarterly (CQ) Researcher
Ref H 35 .E35

CIVIL RIGHTS
Encyclopedia of Civil Rights in America
Ref E 185.61 .E544 1998

American Reforms and Reformers
Ref HQ 1412 .A46 1996

Historical Dictionary of the Civil Rights Movement
Ref E 185.61 .L84 1997


NEW YORK CITY
The Encyclopedia of New York City
Ref F 128.3 .E75 1995

The Historical Atlas of New York City
Ref F 128.3 .H65 1994


TOBACCO
The Encyclopedia of Smoking & Tobacco
Ref HV 5760 .H57 1999

The Encyclopedia of Drugs & Alcohol
Ref HV 5804 .E53 1995


WOMEN
The Women's Movement
Ref HQ 1236.5 .U6 R93 1996

Milestones: A Chronology of American Women's History
Ref HQ 1410 .W434 1997

The Encyclopedia of Women's History in America
Ref HQ 1410 .C85 1996

The ABC-CLIO Companion to Women in the Workplace
Ref HD 6095 .S34 1993


PRESIDENTS
Encyclopedia of the American Presidency
Ref JK 511 .P775 1992

Facts About the Presidents
Ref E 176.1 .K3 1989


HATE CRIMES
Hate Crimes
Ref HV 6773.52 .A47 1999

Racial & Religious Violence in America
Ref HN 90. V5 R33 1991







CATALOGS (Where to find BOOKS)

A. F&M’s Library Catalog
Search the catalog to find out what books, journals, newspapers, videos, maps, CDs, music, etc., the library owns.

NOTE: There are no journal articles in the catalog!

To find a book, begin by conducting a Keyword search our your topic.

Analyze your topic or research question and break it down into its key concepts, which becomes the Keyword search. Once you have found a record for an item that looks useful, click on a Subject Heading to retrieve other items with similar content.

EXAMPLE:

TOPIC: "the myth of perfect suburban happiness"

SEARCH STATEMENT:myth and suburban

SUBJECT HEADINGS:
Suburban Life
Suburbs--United States




B. WorldCat
A catalog of library holdings worldwide. Search here if you are having difficulty locating bookson your topic, and you have a lot of time before your work is due. Obtaining books found in WorldCat requires Interlibrary Loan (ILL).




INDEXES & ABSTRACTS (Where to find ARTICLES)

A. America: History and Life
Comprehensive bibliography of articles on the history and culture of the United States and Canada from pre-history to the present.

B. Humanities Full Text (FirstSearch)
Indexes over 300 English-language periodicals covering classical studies, history, literature, performing arts, philosophy, and related fields.

D. Social Sciences Full Text (FirstSearch)
Indexes over 300 English-language periodicals covering anthropology, economics, psychology, social work, sociology, and related fields.

NOTE: To search up to 3 FirstSearch databases simultaneously:
1. Access the FirstSearch website.
2. In the left frame, under the heading "Databases" click on "List All."
3. Select (by clicking in the little box) up to 3 databases to search. Click on "Select."
4. When the search screen appears, type in your Keyword search, select the "Keyword" search type, and click on the "Search" button.

REMEMBER: Search the F&M Journal Collection to find out if the library has the journals that contain the articles you found in the databases.

If the library does nothave the journal, and you have the time, you can submit an Interlibrary Loan (ILL) request for the article. Allow 5-10 days for the article to arrive.




INTERNET RESOURCES

Yahoo!

HotBot

Criteria to consider when evaluating Web sites:
1. Authority: Who is responsible for the content? Are they an expert on the topic? Does the author identify her/him/them-self?

2. Objectivity: Why was the site created? Is the information presented with a minimum of bias? Is the site meant to persuade the reader?

3. Content: What is presented? Is the content focused, or does it stray all over the place? Is the site appropriate for research/scholarly purposes? Is the design of the site more important than the content?

4. Accuracy: Does the site feature a list of sources, or bibliography, or links to other similar sites? Are other authorities cited?

5. Currency: Is the web site current? Is it currently being maintained? Is there indication of when it was last updated anywhere on the page?

TIP: When using a web site for research, print a
copy of the first page for verification.

Web sites come and go easily!

For assistance contact Lisa Stillwell, Reference Librarian,
by phone: 291.3844, or by email: lisa.stillwell@fandm.edu






Last updated: ls, 2/01